Conditional Logic

Conditional logic decides which action to take based on user input, external conditions or other information. All conditional logic starts with a condition: a simple expression that can be evaluated to True or False.
To build a condition, you can use any combination of literal values or variables along with logical operators. Following table lists the basic logical operators.

Operator Description
= Equal to.
<> Not equal to.
< Less than.
> Greater than.
<= Less than or equal to.
>= Greater than or equal to.
And Logical and (evaluates to True only if both expressions are True).
AndAlso Similar to And, but it doesn’t evaluate the second expression if the first one is
False. This is a useful approach if evaluating the second option would be time
consuming or could cause an error if the first condition is False.
Or Logical or (evaluates to True if either expression is True).
OrElse Similar to Or, but it doesn’t evaluate the second expression if the first one is True.
This is a useful approach if evaluating the second option would be time-consuming or
could cause an error if the first condition is True.

You can use the comparison operators (<, >, <=, >=) with numeric types and with strings. A string is deemed to be “less than” another string if it occurs earlier in an alphabetic sort. Thus “apple” is less than “attach.”

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